Friday 26th June
6.30 for 7pm start
Set in the cloud forests of Ecuador, one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet, this beautifully captured documentary celebrates its unique wildlife and the efforts to protect Western Ecuador’s last intact forested catchment from illegal logging and other forms of degradation.

Narrated by John Seed. Music by Beatrice Lewis

John_Seed*Special Presentation session by the films’ narrator John Seed, founder of the Rainforest Information Centre. Read more about Johns’ work here
Entry $10
Funds from this session will be directed to the Los Cedros crowd-funding Campaign, with a goal of raising $12,000 immediately to be able to re-survey the boundaries of the reserve and for local staff to have the living expenses to be able to travel to Ibarra and Quito to meet with government officials to advocate for the integrity of the reserve. Also, patrol must be hired to assist the community members who watch the trails for illegal logging and hunting. And lastly Los Cedros need to maintain all that it has built to house volunteers, researchers and tourists that are the backbone of the monthly support for the reserve’s management. The more people that come to the reserve the better chance they have of protecting!

Los Cedros Trailer from reel motive on Vimeo.

Words from David Nicastro, Director of the documentary film, Los Cedros.

“Over nine weeks of filming in the cloud forests of Northwest Ecuador, we captured a seemingly endless variety of flora and fauna. To our dismay, we also filmed illegal loggers and ranchers destroying the remaining primary forests nearby. All we could do was film and bear witness. What started out as a wildlife documentary, quickly turned into something much bigger.”

“It is hoped that this film will raise the international profile of the Los Cedros Biological Reserve, showcasing some of its incredible biodiversity, and the threats to its survival. It also touches on the logging of other protected areas, including the Amazon.”

“This film is a call to action. Visit these magical places, if you can, volunteer. If you cannot be there in person, then support the work of groups like Amazon Watch Allies Australia and the Rainforest Information Centre.”

 

catalainaScreens with Catalina y el Sol | Catalina and the Sun

France / Argentina / Germany 2015, 16 min | Anna Paula Hönig

According to Catalina, if you want to see things clearly you need to close your eyes. The girl wanders across vast salt lake under the blazing sun. According to her grandmother, the lake is made up of the dried tears of storytellers, for, in order for the sun to shine, a story must be sacrificed every day to the sun god Tata Inti. This is what the legend demands. Here in the highlands among llamas and cacti Catalina is especially close to the sun. Her grandmother has already handed down an incredible number of stories to her and she must remember them all because, when her grandmother dies, it will be Catalina’s turn. She is at one with the sun – and she has much to tell it.

kathleen_pachamama2015_webSpecial Dance Performance by Kathleen Gonzalez

“In ancestral cultures, dance is the core, a kind of sacred medicine. Dance is grounded, connected the spirit of Mother Earth. Unless you surrender to the dance you can’t hunt quietly. It is an integral part of human existence. It should be possible to translate from the traditional essence to the contemporary world. Dance is the universal language. It is our human identity, our souls in celebration. Dance is the universal cure.”

Kathleen Gonzalez is a Colombian contemporary artist currently based in Melbourne Australia. Her work encompasses diverse forms of native experiences to contemporary expression of art-dance sensation and emotions. Kathleen is also an ethnologic dance investigator. She researches contemporary and interactive emotional dancing, with a particular focus on “Ethnodanceology Art”.
Ethnodanceology- Etnodanzologia


The Pachamama Festival is only possible through the support of the Addison Road Community Centre.