Markets at Pachamama Festival

Pachamama Festival

22nd June 2019 10am – 11pm

Addison Road Picture House, Marrickville

At this year’s Pachamama Festival several artisan market stalls will fill Addison Road Community Centre. The stalls, while each offering unique crafts, are bound together by a common thread: they focus on environmental and indigenous sustainability, embodying a core ethos of SLAFF’s Pachamama Festival. The Pachamama Festival, which started in 2014, promotes sustainability and fosters an appreciation for Pachamama (Mother Earth in the Quechua and Aymara languages) through storytelling, film, photography, music and art. The Festival also seeks to showcase the work of indigenous groups in Australia and Latin America and to highlight the value of their traditions, which can so easily be swept aside in the globalised and commercialised world of today.

Full Pachamama Festival Program

Check out the stallholders at the Pachamama Festival this year!

MAHICO celebrates textiles as a different method of storytelling. MAHICO works in partnership with Indigenous weavers in Mexico to showcase unique, high-quality, ethically-produced textiles and stories. It seeks to support and empower artisans, by allowing them to share their traditional techniques and systems of knowledge, so that they can be passed on to future generations and teach us how to respect our planet. To see how MAHICO weaves together ethics and aesthetics, check out its Facebook and Instagram.

Mami Watta Collections was founded by Ana Maria, a Colombian indigenous activist. Her family comes from the Andean highlands of Boyacá, the land of the Muisca people. Saddened by the loss of this culture in mainstream Colombia, she strives to support the preservation of traditional cultures around the world. Ana Maria works directly with a group of artisans from the Embera Chami tribe, who have been victims of internal displacement due to the armed conflict in Colombia. Mami Watta Collections offers handcrafted art pieces that utilise traditional indigenous beading techniques. To see Mami Watta Collections’ beautiful creations, take a look at its website and Instagram.

Maraca are Mauricio Echeverry and Jorge Mansilla, who work exclusively with rescued, upcycled and handmade materials to create one-of-a-kind earrings, necklaces, button covers, shoe accessories and brooches. Their accessories are wacky, creative and super-fun, inspired by nature, tropical drinks, flamboyant nannas, colourful music and visits to Bunnings. To see more of Maraca’s marvellous creations, take a look at its website and Instagram.

Tonsuca means “blossom,” “prospering” and “birth” in the Muisca language of the indigenous Chibcha community in Colombia. Colombian-born Paola Montana founded the Tonsuca project to support independent young talents and create unique, meaningful and sustainable art. The project strongly believes in sustainable design and draws inspiration from the artisanship of indigenous groups in South America. To learn more about Tonsuca, check out its Facebook and Instagram.

The owner of The Perfect Dawn, loved Dhuku- Printed headwraps from a young age. Tracey learnt her knowledge of the artform from the women in her family- mainly her mother.

It is traditional for the older women in the family to pass on the knowledge of the traditions, and the meanings, associated with each Dhuku style. Different colours and styles have individual meaning and are work certain occasions. Some styles are for happy moments and others for more formal occasions like weddings.

Tracey moved to Australia from Harare in Zimbabwe in 2009 and started The Perfect Dawn, which specialises in African Accessories in early 2017.

She has been particularly inspired by the many women who have approached her to buy the headwraps, and learn her head wrap styles, due to losing their hair while undergoing treatment for cancer. This was the initial inspiration for Tracey to share her knowlege through holding workshops. All women are welcome.

Ngutata
(I give to you for my sake) ngyiampaa nation, wongaibon language.
I dance and sing my lore for many audiences. I run native jewellery making and first nation educational workshops
I make hand crafted native jewellery with natural resources and recycled resources. My Business is ethical, sustainable and draws from my old peoples ways. The natural materials are all hand collected and jewellery hand made.
I am first nation, all my grandparents are first nation. I belong to the elder Bunya tree rainforests of Wakka Wakka. I belong to the Dunghatti where the fresh water meets the salt water.
I belong to Gamilaroi where the Emu Flys. I belong to the Ngyiampaa where the elder fish traps lie.
I am a proud first nation woman. I aim to break barriers through having the necessary conversations to heal the wounds of my people and our nation.

AMARLA HAND MADE BAGS ARE 100% HAND CRAFTED BY THE INDIGENOUS WOMEN OF THE WAYUU TRIBE FROM LA GUAJIRA, COLOMBIA.

EACH PIECE IS A ONE-OF-A-KIND DESIGN, TAKING ROUGHLY ONE MONTH TO UNIQUELY HAND CRAFT EACH MOCHILA BAG. ​
WE ARE COMMITTED TO A FAIR AND ETHICAL TRADING FRAMEWORK WHICH SUPPORTS THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES OF LA GUAJIRA AND PRESERVES THEIR CULTURAL VALUES. ​
YOUR PURCHASE WILL HELP KEEP THEIR VALUES AND TRADITIONS ALIVE.

According to Yogitown’s creator, Chilean-born Valerita Ramirez, the brand was born from the idea to yoke clothing and yoga. The designs are hand-drawn and screen-printed in Sydney’s Inner West, using vegan water-based inks. The garments use only organic fibres and are manufactured ethically, as certified by the Fair Wear Foundation. Yogitown’s ethical and sustainable production process reflects their respect for Pachamama (Mother Earth). To see some of Yogitown’s beautiful designs, take a look at its website and Instagram.

LUNA LOBA Collection is a conscious clothing brand that aspires to make beautiful clothing, accessories and home decor that have a low impact on the environment. We create with Eco friendly plant based materials, repurposed textile scraps and pre loved tribal textile. Through our Collection we hope to showcase the artisanship and celebrate the diverse cultures of the various Ethnic groups in South East Asia.